*_*
my name is rachel and multi-feature dvd sets are my kryptonite.
LAUREL
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im so excited for flume & zedd tomorrow my heart is jumping around

fuckyeahdirectors:

David Lean and Peter O’Toole on-set of Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

fuckyeahdirectors:

David Lean and Peter O’Toole on-set of Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

maybe it was a mistake asking the most conservative person i know to go to seasons w me lol 

im sleepy and i just wanna dance 

so excited to go to korea for the whole summer but im going to miss COG :((((((((((((((((( fuck

❝ Stop thinking about art works as objects, and start thinking about them as triggers for experiences. (Roy Ascott’s phrase.) That solves a lot of problems: we don’t have to argue whether photographs are art, or whether performances are art, or whether Carl Andre’s bricks or Andrew Serranos’s piss or Little Richard’s ‘Long Tall Sally’ are art, because we say, ‘Art is something that happens, a process, not a quality, and all sorts of things can make it happen.’ … [W]hat makes a work of art ‘good’ for you is not something that is already ‘inside’ it, but something that happens inside you — so the value of the work lies in the degree to which it can help you have the kind of experience that you call art.

— Brian Eno (via anieastonbaker)

bbook:

“Perhaps the only difference between me and other people is that I’ve always demanded more of the sunset, more spectacular colors when the sun hit the horizon. That is perhaps my only sin,” says Joe in Lars von Trier’s sexual odyssey-cum-character study Nymphomaniac. It’s an admission shared by the film’s leading woman—a self-proclaimed nymphomaniac played with quiet brilliance by Charlotte Gainsbourg—but one powerfully echoes Trier’s own sentiments, as he once again utilizes the women of his films as a conduit for his own psychological inclinations and expression.
In an interview for his 2011 doomsday ballet, Melancholia, Trier spoke to the importance of rituals—both the emptiness they can illicit and the weight they can impress upon our lives, saying:

It’s a great shame that melancholics don’t value rituals. I’m having tough times at parties myself.  Now we’ll all have fun, fun fun. Perhaps because melancholics set the stakes higher than just a few beers and some music. And there’s more of a party if we have coloured festoons. It seems so phony. Rituals are, you know. But if rituals are worth nothing, that goes for everything, you know.

He speaks of people like himself—the melancholics of the world—as those eternally longing, whose constant state of yearning allows them to possess nothing, and thus have nothing to lose. He says, “perhaps that’s a way of surviving. Then you don’t have to mourn the things you lose.” And in Nymphomaniac, here we see a character whose insatiable desire for sex and for pleasure is not only about the satisfying the physical sensation, but about a deep-rooted longing, and need to fill the emptiness and the eternal void that makes life frightening. For Joe, who repeatedly demands, “Fill all my holes,” sex becomes the ritual that gives her life meaning and structure,  making the film not only an erotic epic, but an exploration of the rituals we hold sacred that give way to addictions and become the fire that keep us alive.
Fascinating in its novel-esque richness, Nymphomaniac: Part I, which has its theatrical debut this Friday,  is a cacophony of visceral emotion and brilliant storytelling, weaving together the fragmented tale of one woman’s life. And after ravaging the screen in Antichrist and Melancholia, Gainsbourg delivers a tortured and deeply intense performance as Joe, allowing us to empathize with a woman who can be both disastrous in her behavior, but incredibly human and refreshingly honest.
Charlotte Gainsbourg on Sex, Suffering, and Becoming a ‘Nymphomaniac’ for Lars von Trier

bbook:

“Perhaps the only difference between me and other people is that I’ve always demanded more of the sunset, more spectacular colors when the sun hit the horizon. That is perhaps my only sin,” says Joe in Lars von Trier’s sexual odyssey-cum-character study Nymphomaniac. It’s an admission shared by the film’s leading woman—a self-proclaimed nymphomaniac played with quiet brilliance by Charlotte Gainsbourg—but one powerfully echoes Trier’s own sentiments, as he once again utilizes the women of his films as a conduit for his own psychological inclinations and expression.

In an interview for his 2011 doomsday ballet, Melancholia, Trier spoke to the importance of rituals—both the emptiness they can illicit and the weight they can impress upon our lives, saying:

It’s a great shame that melancholics don’t value rituals. I’m having tough times at parties myself.  Now we’ll all have fun, fun fun. Perhaps because melancholics set the stakes higher than just a few beers and some music. And there’s more of a party if we have coloured festoons. It seems so phony. Rituals are, you know. But if rituals are worth nothing, that goes for everything, you know.

He speaks of people like himself—the melancholics of the world—as those eternally longing, whose constant state of yearning allows them to possess nothing, and thus have nothing to lose. He says, “perhaps that’s a way of surviving. Then you don’t have to mourn the things you lose.” And in Nymphomaniac, here we see a character whose insatiable desire for sex and for pleasure is not only about the satisfying the physical sensation, but about a deep-rooted longing, and need to fill the emptiness and the eternal void that makes life frightening. For Joe, who repeatedly demands, “Fill all my holes,” sex becomes the ritual that gives her life meaning and structure,  making the film not only an erotic epic, but an exploration of the rituals we hold sacred that give way to addictions and become the fire that keep us alive.

Fascinating in its novel-esque richness, Nymphomaniac: Part I, which has its theatrical debut this Friday,  is a cacophony of visceral emotion and brilliant storytelling, weaving together the fragmented tale of one woman’s life. And after ravaging the screen in Antichrist and Melancholia, Gainsbourg delivers a tortured and deeply intense performance as Joe, allowing us to empathize with a woman who can be both disastrous in her behavior, but incredibly human and refreshingly honest.

Charlotte Gainsbourg on Sex, Suffering, and Becoming a ‘Nymphomaniac’ for Lars von Trier

❝ Ryan is like a mixture of James Stewart, Charles Bronson, Alain Delon, Lee Marvin and little bit of Marcello Mastroianni. If you look at him on screen, your eye automatically goes to him. Very few people are born with that. And very few actors who have that also have the guts to pursue the movies they want to do, rather than take the dream machine offered to them. It takes a lot of integrity to do the things he has done. He’s like the Velvet Underground or the Ramones.

—  Nicolas Winding Refn (via howtocatchamonster)

(Source: simplygosling)

(Source: hansoloclub)

I need a fake so i can go to audien fucking fuck it’s FREE too god damn